Posts Tagged ‘data caps’

HughesNet Gen4,Wildblue Exede & DishNET – What is the difference?

HughesNet Gen4,Wildblue Exede & DishNET – What is the difference? 

Today, satellite Internet is fast becoming the system of choice to the millions of residents living in rural America that are unserved, or underserved by cable, wireless or DSL Internet providers. With the introduction of the next generation of high powered –high capacity “super satellites” no longer are consumers forced to settle for download speeds that are only 10-30 times faster than dial-up.

Since the late ‘90s when Hughes introduced the world to the concept of connecting to the internet through a satellite, Hughes has installer over 1.9 million systems around the globe. That is 5 times more than any other provider.

In the United States, Hughes is marketed under the trade name of HughesNet.

HughesNet owns and manages their own Network Operations Center. The HughesNet system utilizes an Internet Protocol over Satellite (IPoS) standard which sets it apart from the WildBlue Exede system that uses the DOCSIS communication system, which is optimized for cable networks. IPoS was endorsed by the Telecommunication Industry Association (TIA) of North America in December 2003.

HughesNet – Wildblue Exede – DishNET 

Today’s consumers living in rural areas have a choice of providers when it comes to selecting a satellite internet provider. Bothe HughesNet and WildBlue – Exede are offering download speeds that are in many cases, faster and more reliable than the local DSL services or wireless internet providers. Dish Network has introduced their house branded version by combining the two services being marketed under their trade name of dishNET.

Let’s take a look at the three different services:

DishNET by Dish Network

On October 1, 2012 Dish Network, www.newdish.tv, introduced their version of a High speed Internet service called DISHNET.  DishNET service is made available by using the HughesNet EchoStar VXII satellite and the WildBlue Exede ViaSat One satellites. The DishNET plans are unique to DISH, and are different than those offered by HughesNet and WildBlue Exede.

The DishNET service offers three plans starting at $49.99 a month. Their basic service has download speeds of up to 5 Mbps and upload speeds of up to 1 Mbps. The monthly data cap is 10 GB and is split into what they call Anytime Data and Bonus Data.

Anytime Data, as the name describes, offers 5 GB that can be used any time of day or night.  The 5 GB of Bonus Data is only available between the hours of 2 am and 8 am. DishNET counts both, uploads and downloads when calculating their data usage. Customers who exede their monthly data limits will be slowed down to 128k until they cycle out of their monthly service. Additional GBs may be purchased, or you can upgrade to a larger plan. All plans have a $10 a month lease fee. Qualified new and existing DISH Network video customers may receive a $10 Bundle discount on their service with a new 24 month agreement.

The DishNET service comes with a one year parts, 90 day labor warranty.

WildBlue Exede

The WildBlue Exede service, www.exede-usa.com, offers three plans starting at $49.99 a month. All of the WildBlue exede plans offer the same speeds; up to 12 Mbps downloads and up to 3 Mbps uploads. The monthly data cap on the basic plan is 10 GB a month and WildBlue Exede offers unlimited usage between the hours of 2 am and 7am.WildBlue Exede counts both uploads and downloads when calculating their data usage. Customers who exede their monthly data limits will be slowed down to 128k until they cycle out of their monthly service. Additional GBs may be purchased, or you can upgrade to a larger plan. All plans have a $9.99 a month lease fee. All plans require a 24 month agreement.

The WildBlue Exede service comes with a one year parts, 90 day labor warranty.

 

HughesNet Gen4

The HughesNet Gen4 service, www.yourlocalinstaller.com, offers three plans starting at $49.99 a month. The basic service has download speeds of up to 10 Mbps and upload speeds of up to 1 Mbps. The monthly data cap is 20 GB and is split into what they call Anytime and Bonus Bytes.

Anytime, as the name describes, offers 10 GB that can be used any time of day or night.  The 10 GB of Bonus Data is only available between the hours of 2 am and 8 am. HughesNet data usage is calculated on downloads only, and offers unlimited uploads day or night. Customers who exede their monthly data limits will be slowed down to 128k until they cycle out of their monthly service. Additional GBs may be purchased, or you can upgrade to a larger plan.

 HughesNet is available for purchase or lease. When purchasing the equipment, the customer pays $199.99 for the equipment and $199.99 for the installation. Currently a mail in rebate is available for the cost of installation. Customers who purchase their systems do not pay a monthly equipment lease fee.

Customers that choose to lease the system have a $9.99 a month lease fee.

Customers that purchase the equipment receive a 1 year parts and 6 months labor warranty.

Customers that lease the equipment will receive a 6 month labor warranty and perpetual parts warranty.

When it comes to the user experience, HughesNet also exceeds expectations because they do not limit the number of computers that can be connected to the system and offer a convenient Static IP address option if necessary. The minimum service commitment for all three  companies is 24 months, but HughesNet offers a six months labor warranty instead of the 90 days available with WildBlue Exede and DishNET.

HughesNet is the only satellite provider to offer a service protection plan. They offer the basic and the express plan. The Basic plan is $6.99 a month and guarantees the service technician will contact you within 48 hours, and the Express repair plan is $11.99 a month and guarantees that the service technician will be on site next business day.

Bonus Offer from John!!

Customers that have taken the time to read my blog will receive a $50 additional mail in rebate on a new GEN 4 system if they ask for me, John Pearce. The number to the call center is 1 800-592-3814. If I am out of the office, leave a message for me and I will call you back within 24 hours! The only way to get this offer is if I place your order into the system. Thank for reading my blog. JP

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20

10 2012

Top 6 Complaints I Hear About Satellite Internet

Well, I have been involved in the sales, installation and service of satellite internet for over 10 years now, and involved in satellite TV for over 30, so I guess it time to come clean, and stop all the sales hype, and tell you what I hear people complain about the most. Here are my opinions on some of the most common complaints I hear about satellite internet services.

  •  Rain Fade or Rain Attenuation is a weakening of the satellite signal as it passes through raindrops. Any satellite system operating in the Ku or Ka bands (12/14 GHz or higher) will be affected by rain fade at some time. Today’s satellite operators have built more powerful satellites and increased the size of their dishes, but in the end, customer can and will experience loss of signal during heavy storms. Contrary to what the cable companies would like you to believe, don’t expect to lose your satellite signal every time it rains, though. Rain outage will only occur during the heaviest rains with only a small portion of the signal experiencing attenuation. In fact, a typical satellite signal traveling 22,300 miles, less than .02% will be affected by rain fade.
  • Data Caps or Fair Access Policy is a set limit on the transfer of data over a specific period of time. According to my contacts at the national operations center, 5% of the internet users are consuming 90% of the bandwidth. All satellite internet service providers, most of the cellular service providers and recently some of the cable and telco companies are setting bandwidth limits on their plans. My average customer will rarely, if ever be affected by these limits as long as they understand that if they are frequently downloading content, such as HDTV movies (yes! streaming videos is downloading) , large software programs or interactive on-line gaming they will use up their data plan faster than most other on-line activities.
  • Lag or Signal Latency in On-Line Gaming. This is one subject that I have to spend hours trying to explain, especially to hard line gamers with PlayStations and Xboxes  that  have moved to the country without realizing that they are not going to able to compete on a level playing field with their opponents. Most people think that the satellite’s signal travels so quickly that the time taken for it to get from your computer to its target would be irrelevant, unfortunately, that is not necessarily the case. The time it takes the satellite signal to travel 22,300 miles up to the satellite, back down to the gateway (the facility where your signal connects to the world wide web), out on to the internet  and back to the consumer is minimal; unless you are playing a contact game such as Call to Duty, or other “tag” type games. Here, the delay, measured in milliseconds, could mean the difference between moving on to the next round or getting eliminated. Great improvement have been made over the past few years by the engineers at HughesNet in acceleration technology, but the fact remains, with satellite internet there will be a lag or latency.
  • Not Getting a Paper Bill. Many companies are making efforts to get away from sending bills out to the customers and have gone to a form of paperless billing. This allows the providers to automate their billing, while keeping cost down associated with mail processing and the manual processing of payments.
  • Installation Delays and Rescheduling. We feel that our installation-service network is the best in the business. Currently we are running a better than 85% track record on the completion of installations on day of schedule. However, there are factors that may cause the delay or reschedule in your installation. Weather is probably the number one factor. Although most installers have no problem working in the rain and snow, sometimes it can cause the need to reschedule. Other situations, although rare, could be that if you are not scheduled for the AM installation, that the installer may get tied up on the first job and there is not enough time in the day to complete their second job. A standard installation usually takes between 2 to 4 hours, but in the industry there are many unforeseen circumstances that can extend that time to 8 hours or more. My recommendation is to always try to schedule your installation for first thing in the morning.
  • Technical Support. The issue of technical support being overseas is one that the service providers are finally starting to take action on. New, U.S. based tech support centers are being opened and staffed with qualified representatives. Technical support in the off-shore call centers have also stepped up their game to address the often voiced displeasure of having to deal with someone that that is hard to understand, or has different mannerism than we are used too. But next time you call for tech support, if the representative speaks with an accent, don’t assume it is an off shore call center, due to the ethnic diversity in the U.S.A., many of these call centers will have representatives that speak more than one language. As with any call center that you are dealing with, if you are not satisfied with the level of support that you are receiving, you can always ask to speak with a supervisor.
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19

09 2012